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Summary Information About Kahramanmaraş

Kahramanmaraş Province is a province of Turkey. Its provincial capital is the city of Kahramanmara.

Kahramanmaraş is traversed by the northeasterly line of equal latitude and longitude.

Kahramanmaraş has historically been famous for its gold. The textile industry is relatively new and mostly machinated.

Marash, officially known as Kahramanmaraş historically known as Germanicea, is a city in the Mediterranean Region of Turkey and the administrative center of Kahramanmaraş Province. Before 1973, Kahramanmaraş was officially named Maraş, and later, it attained the prefix “kahraman” (meaning “hero” in Turkish) to commemorate Battle of Marash. The city lies on a plain at the foot of the Ahir Dağı (Ahir Mountain). The region is best known for its distinctive ice cream, and its production of salep, a powder made from dried orchid tubers. Kahramanmaraş Airport has flights to İstanbul and Ankara.

Population

4425789

Area

11973.00 km 2

Location

Districts

30

Municipalities

31

Towns

0

Villages

0

History of Kahramanmaraş

In the early Iron Age, Maraş was the capital city of the Syro-Hittite state Gurgum (Hieroglyphic Luwian Kurkuma). It was known as “the Kurkumaean city” to its Luwian inhabitants and as Marqas to the Assyrians.

In 711 BC, the land of Gurgum was annexed as an Assyrian province and renamed Marqas after its capital.

 

In 645, Germanicia was taken from the Byzantines by the Muslim Arabs, to whom the city was known as Marʿash. Over the next three centuries, Marash belonged to the fortified Arab-Byzantine frontier zone (Thughur) and was used as a base for incursions into Byzantine-held Asia Minor by the Arabs. It was destroyed several times during the Arab-Byzantine Wars. The city was also controlled by the Tulunids, Ikhshidids and Hamdanids before the Byzantines, under Nikephoros Phokas, recovered it in 962.

 

Germanikeia was captured by Baldwin I of Jerusalem in 1098, during the First Crusade, and made part of the County of Edessa, becoming an important center during Crusader rule. In 1100, it was captured by the Danishmends, followed by the Seljuks in 1103.

In 1107, Crusaders led by Tancred retook it with aid from Toros I of Little Armenia.

In 1135, the Danishmends besieged Germanikeia unsuccessfully, but captured it the next year. However, the Crusaders retook it in 1137. Sultan Mesud I of the Sultanate of Rum took the city in 1149

 

Marash was captured by the Zengids in 1151, but was recaptured by the Seljuks in 1152. Maraş was recaptured by the Zengids in 1173 and was left to Mleh. Marash passed to the Seljuks in 1174 and to the Ayyubids in 1182.

After the defeat of Emperor Romanos IV Diogenes at the Battle of Manzikert in 1071, Philaretos Brachamios, a former Byzantine general, founded a principality centred on the city, which stretched from Antioch to Edessa.

Kaykhusraw I, Sultan of Rum captured Marash in 1208. Seljuk rule lasted to 1258, when Maraş was captured by the Armenian Kingdom of Cilicia, following the war with the Ilkhanate. Served by an Armenian Apostolic Church Archbishop, it became for a very short period of time, the seat of the Catholicossate of the Great House of Cilicia. Marash was captured by Al-Ashraf Khalil, Mamluk Sultan, in 1292. It was recaptured by Hethum II, King of Cilician Armenia, in 1299. Marash was finally taken by the Mamluks in 1304.

 

During Ottoman rule, the city was initially the centre of Eyalet of Dulkadir (also called Eyalet of Zûlkâdiriyye) and then an administrative centre of a sanjak in the Vilayet of Aleppo. After the First World War, Marash was controlled by British troops between 22 February 1919 and 30 October 1919, then by French troops, after the Armistice of Mudros. It was taken over by the Turkish National Movement after the Battle of Marash on 13 February 1920.

 

In 1973, Marash’s name was changed to Kahramanmaraş when the Turkish government added “Kahraman” to the name, in reference to the resistance to the French occupation after the First World War. Kahraman means “heroic” or “brave” in Turkish.

 

Districts of Kahramanmaraş

  • Afşin
  • Andırın
  • Çağlayancerit
  • Ekinözü
  • Elbistan
  • Göksun
  • Nurhak
  • Pazarcık
  • Türkoğlu

Point of Interests in Kahramanmaraş

Kahramanmaraş has historically been famous for its gold. The textile industry is relatively new and mostly machinated.

According to the official language-based 1965 census, the province (including the city) had a population of predominantly Turks and Turkmens (88.4%) along with Kurds (10.7%) and Circassians (1.0%).

Several internationally known ice cream companies, like MADO, Yaşar Pastanesi, EDO and Ferah Pastanesi, started their business in Kahramanmaraş, and thousands of people visit the city because of its ice cream (dondurma in Turkish).

Let's see the cuisine of Kahramanmaraş

  • MARAŞ TARHANA ÇORBASI
  • MARAŞ YOĞURTLU KEBAP
  • MARAŞ İÇLİ KÖFTE
  • RAVANDA ŞERBETİ
  • EKŞİLİ ET KABAĞI SULUSU
  • CEVİZLİ KIRMA TATLISI
  • ÇULLAMA
  • HAPISA
  • ACEM PİLAVI
  • MARAŞ DONDURMASI
  • ŞIRA ÇEŞİTLERİ
  • ÜRTMEKLİ ÇÖKELEK BÖREĞİ

For more information about Kahramanmaraş

https://www.kulturportali.gov.tr/turkiye/kahramanmaras/genelbilgiler

 

For more information, you may visit the official government website of Kahramanmaraş.

http://www.kahramanmaras.gov.tr/

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